Personal Involvement is the most reliable.

Natalya Radoman, mother of children, HR-specialist, city of Yaroslavl'.
Organised a parental control of school feeding in the school her children attend.
When my youngest child started attending school, school feeding became the central
conversation piece on all parent internet forums and during parent-teacher conferences.
Many mothers and fathers were quite unsatisfied with the quality of the food at the school,
inviting others to collectively reject the meals of this school altogether. I, however, was not
pleased with this decision and wanted to find an alternative solution.
The main management principle that is used to resolve issues within manufacturing facilities
is "Go see it through". Thanks to the experts from the "School Meals Movement" ANO that
provided me with guidance to know what is there to see in a school cafeteria or kitchen for
any parents with no school catering expertise. Their webpage contains detailed instructions
and guidelines for carrying out a parental control of the school cafeteria and kitchen, and
additional resources that relate to the relevant legal standing and further applications. All of
the materials available have been produced by the leading experts in the field of social
feeding programmes.
Tilda Publishing
I'd like to point out that the very presence of parents within the school cafeteria disciplines both the students and the kitchen staff, also leading to improvement.
I believe that only personal involvement of parents in the eating routine of their kids at school and/or kindergarten can serve as the best representation of actuality.
I've decided to propose this idea to the headmaster of school number 42 in Yaroslavl', which
my kids attend. Natalya Vladimirovna (headmaster) reacted very positively, suggesting that
she'd be quite pleased if the parental control method takes off, as she's been hearing
complaints from other parents, which are often rather non-constructive.
The next step to take was to speak in front of the parent committee to come to a common
resolution. The issue with school meals has already been actively discussed, so it's
relevance was unquestionable. However, the parents of middle and high schoolers reacted
quite indifferent to the proposition, as they have already been attempting to resolve certain
issues relating to the school meals on their own time, unfortunately with little success. The
mothers of first graders showed a lot more enthusiasm, as we really wanted the school
meals to become better organized - as a well fed child thinks about studying more than a
hungry one.
During our conference we've devised a group that would be responsible for coming up with a checklist for the parental control, as well as the schedule. The schedule was made in such a way that there would be parents supervising two break times in their first shift, and two in
their second shift every day. The parental committee had to inform all other members of
upcoming inspections and the respective methods of carrying them out. During the
inspections the parents would compare the actual menu items to the ones portrayed on the
webpage of the school, they would take measurements of temperature using a non-contact
thermometer, see if the children were enjoying the food, bought and tried it themselves, and
tried to assess the levels of waste. Eventually the inspecting parents would fill out their
checklists and document their report with photographs that would later be shared with all
other members of the parent committees.
During their visits, the parents would speak to the students as well as the kitchen staff. Some surface level issues were resolvable on the spot, while others required administrative action. There were also some that called for city and/or region-wide amendments.
One of the more critical issues was with some of the items on the school menu. Some would be absolutely adored by students, others would be commonly rejected. And while discussing individual children's taste preferences can be quite entertaining, it doesn't yield constructive outcomes. The general trends in food wasting should be monitored, with appropriate conclusions drawn for the average, then alternatives should be proposed.
Even the most delicious meal can end up with the rest of the trash if it is cold by the time that the children get to it. But believe me, the presence of parents holding thermometers
magically increased the average temperature of dishes by 10/15 degrees! Just the very
understanding that the situation has involved independent individuals that have a blood
relation to the children receiving these meals called for the kitchen staff to set up the tables
almost before the children arrived, instead of much earlier.
I'd like to point out that the very presence of parents within the school cafeteria disciplines
both the students and the kitchen staff, also leading to improvement. I believe that only
personal involvement of parents in the eating routine of their kids at school and/or
kindergarten can serve as the best representation of actuality.